Posted on

A Companion to Alfred Hitchcock by Thomas Leitch

By Thomas Leitch

The main complete quantity ever released on Alfred Hitchcock, overlaying his occupation and legacy in addition to the wider cultural and highbrow contexts of his paintings.

  • Contains thirty chapters through the best Hitchcock students
  • Covers his lengthy profession, from his earliest contributions to different administrators’ silent movies to his final uncompleted final movie
  • Details the long-lasting legacy he left to filmmakers and audiences alike

Content:
Chapter 1 Hitchcock's Lives (pages 9–27): Thomas Leitch
Chapter 2 Hitchcock's Literary assets (pages 28–47): Ken Mogg
Chapter three Hitchcock and Early Filmmakers (pages 48–66): Charles Barr
Chapter four Hitchcock's Narrative Modernism: Ironies of Fictional Time (pages 67–85): Thomas Hemmeter
Chapter five Hitchcock and Romance (pages 87–108): Lesley Brill
Chapter 6 relatives Plots: Hitchcock and Melodrama (pages 109–125): Richard R. Ness
Chapter 7 Conceptual Suspense in Hitchcock's motion pictures (pages 126–137): Paula Marantz Cohen
Chapter eight “Tell Me the tale So Far”: Hitchcock and His Writers (pages 139–161): Leland Poague
Chapter nine Suspicion: Collusion and Resistance within the paintings of Hitchcock's girl Collaborators (pages 162–180): Tania Modleski
Chapter 10 A floor Collaboration: Hitchcock and function (pages 181–197): Susan White
Chapter eleven Aesthetic area in Hitchcock (pages 199–218): Brigitte Peucker
Chapter 12 Hitchcock and song (pages 219–236): Jack Sullivan
Chapter thirteen a few Hitchcockian photographs (pages 237–252): Murray Pomerance
Chapter 14 Hitchcock's Silent Cinema (pages 253–269): Sidney Gottlieb
Chapter 15 Gaumont Hitchcock (pages 270–288): Tom Ryall
Chapter sixteen Hitchcock Discovers the USA: The Selznick?Era movies (pages 289–308): Ina Rae Hark
Chapter 17 From Transatlantic to Warner Bros (pages 309–328): David Sterritt
Chapter 18 Hitchcock, Metteur?En?Scene: 1954–60 (pages 329–346): Joe McElhaney
Chapter 19 The common Hitchcock (pages 347–364): William Rothman
Chapter 20 French Hitchcock, 1945–55 (pages 365–386): James M. Vest
Chapter 21 misplaced in Translation? hearing the Hitchcock–Truffaut Interview (pages 387–404): Janet Bergstrom
Chapter 23 unintended Heroes and talented Amateurs: Hitchcock and beliefs (pages 425–451): Toby Miller and Noel King
Chapter 24 Hitchcock and Feminist feedback: From Rebecca to Marnie (pages 452–472): Florence Jacobowitz
Chapter 25 Queer Hitchcock (pages 473–489): Alexander Doty
Chapter 26 Hitchcock and Philosophy (pages 491–507): Richard Gilmore
Chapter 27 Hitchcock's Ethics of Suspense: Psychoanalysis and the Devaluation of the thing (pages 508–528): Todd McGowan
Chapter 28 events of Sin: The Forgotten Cigarette Lighter and different ethical injuries in Hitchcock (pages 529–552): George Toles
Chapter 29 Hitchcock and the Postmodern (pages 553–571): Angelo Restivo
Chapter 30 Hitchcock's Legacy (pages 572–591): Richard Allen

Show description

Read or Download A Companion to Alfred Hitchcock PDF

Best direction & production books

Children's Theater: A Paradigm, Primer, and Resource

This publication introduces readers to the area of kid's theater by means of highlighting one particular version, The Oyster River avid gamers, a small kid's theater corporation in New Hampshire. by means of exploring the heritage and dynamics in their personal theater corporation, authors Kelly and Walter Eggers observe broader implications, increasing their concentration to incorporate kid's theaters of different forms and in several cultural settings.

Make Your Movie: What You Need to Know About the Business and Politics of Filmmaking

 This e-book is for a person drawn to the company of breaking into the flicks. examine who the main gamers are in terms of getting a film made and the way to navigate the politics of filmmaking from begin to end, from first pitch to filling motion picture seats.

Collaboration in Theatre: A Practical Guide for Designers and Directors

This accesible and necessary consultant addresses the an important dating among theatrical construction staff contributors.

Extra resources for A Companion to Alfred Hitchcock

Example text

Bill Krohn is surely correct in his assertion that “[b]ecause film-making generates an incredible amount of paperwork, it is a better documented creative activity than composing, painting, or even writing” (10). Yet the vast amount of production material on Hitchcock’s films is not complemented by any significant private documents, letters to loved ones from whom he was separated or even a stack of memos like David O. Selznick’s to collaborators he saw every day. And the professional acquaintances whose confidences to interviewers have driven all his biographies to date are passing away.

Eliot and his God. (30) The assumption of a close autobiographical connection between Hitchcock’s private obsessions and his chosen genre has led to a third complication. Because no director has been more closely identified with a given genre, the aptly named Hitchcock thriller, commentators mining Hitchcock’s films for revelations about his life and vice versa have felt free to treat all his films, or at any rate all the thrillers they consider true Hitchcock films, as different versions of a single text.

Because no director has been more closely identified with a given genre, the aptly named Hitchcock thriller, commentators mining Hitchcock’s films for revelations about his life and vice versa have felt free to treat all his films, or at any rate all the thrillers they consider true Hitchcock films, as different versions of a single text. It is as if Hitchcock’s greatest work were not Rear Window or Vertigo or Psycho but the grand narrative of his career. This tendency first blossomed in Eric Rohmer and Claude Chabrol’s Hitchcock: The First Forty-Four Films, which found such unity in his films through The Wrong Man (1956) that the authors defined their method as “observ[ing] an order, a gradation, as in piano exercises,” that “work[s] toward the depths slowly, hoping that our final insights will inevitably illuminate earlier commentary, just as Hitchcock’s films throw mutual and instructive light on one another” (x).

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.01 of 5 – based on 6 votes